Posts tagged religion
여기도 거기에 없어요| The One with Adrian - Neither Here Nor There – Episode 9 (2019)

The More Sibyl Podcast Presents: The One with Adrian - Neither Here Nor There

#Phew (breathe in and out)

Let’s take a deep breath from the back-to-back heavy episodes of ovary talks and whatnots. In this episode, I titled ‘여기도 거기에 없어요’ meaning ‘neither here nor there,’ I talked with my friend, Adrian Patenaude – a confessional poet, one of my pen-pals, and one of the 20-something-year-olds who greatly inspire me. Growing up White in rural Northern Thailand sure had its ups and downs; all of which we unearthed in this episode. We also talked about nostalgia of the moment, our love for books, poetry, and music, giving the gift of music to friends, and reminisced on our Black Mirror viewing party days gone by. I live vicariously through Adrian as she does a great job of archiving her 20s and embracing the awkwardness, quirkiness, otherness, and everything-ness of those growing pains – something that came too late for me in my 20s.

Her poetry has really inspired my work and process, especially with my writing and the show. Reading her poetry is like reading a diary that was accidentally left opened, intentionally; a process she calls performed vulnerability. Also, listen to this episode to find out how she practices self-care.

Adrian can be found (and read) at http://adrianpatenaude.com and has a fangirl IG page where she gushes about one of her passions; follow her here: @lookingforcorny.

Read More
내 머리 속의 목소리| Rising Above the Voices – A Deep Exploration of A Nigerian Living with Schizophrenia: Episode 8 (2019)

The More Sibyl Podcast Presents: Rising Above the Voices – A Deep Exploration of A Nigerian Living with Schizophrenia

For more than 15 years, I have battled with pulsatile tinnitus (the closest diagnosis I have been given) – a condition that equips me with the ultimate pleasure of hearing my own heartbeat (24/7) in the form of a pounding or whooshing sound in both ears. I have done all kinds of series of test ranging from MRI, Doppler scans, to hearing conduction tests, but everything checked out. My symptoms are worse at night, away from the humdrum of the city, causing me increased irritability. Using ear plugs and not thinking about it has helped considerably. For the most part, I have been able to cope with it. It doesn’t really affect me except when it does. I think it’s bad enough having this.

Now imagine that scenario but rather than your heartbeat, you hear actual voices – three distinct ones to be exact. Voices with their unique characteristics and personalities with names to boot. This is a tidbit of what those diagnosed with schizophrenia go through. Schizophrenia is an umbrella-like diagnosis (meaning very broad) with symptoms ranging from delusions, hallucination (auditory and/or visual), disorganized speeches or behavior to some negative symptoms. Suffice to say, each person’s condition is unique to their own.  

Take, for example, our guest for today (let’s call her ‘Sis’) loves the color pink and get excited by it whereas, in another TEDTalk video I watched, the speaker therein talked about how the color red triggered them negatively. Today’s guest is based in the south south part of Nigeria. Sis was diagnosed in 2012 and attributed this to being sexually abused for a prolonged period. Noises from a running tap or generator set trigger her.

For a while, she was catatonic when she was first diagnosed – meaning she could not speak, move, or respond. Getting on medications not only helped her regain her activity, reduce the number of voices to three, but also to harmonize the characters and rule over them. She regrets delaying treatment.

In this episode, we explore her life from diagnosis till date, the impact of this condition on her social life, relationships, activities of daily living, and so much more.

Read More
마음과 건강| The One with Ayokunle Falomo - On Mental Health and Being: Episode 33 (2018)

The More Sibyl Podcast Presents: The One with Ayokunle Falomo

 

First, happy birthday to me! It’s the second anniversary of my 30th birthday! As a way of saying thank you to you all for being wonderful fans, here’s a bonus episode. It’s also a special one because it depicts my favorite trait in all of its rawness – vulnerability. In this episode, my guest – Mr. Ayokunle Falomo and I traded stories on our struggles with depression, how we cope with it, and how religion can be a cure and curse, depending on how it is wielded. I chose to share this with you all because I think it is important to remind you of the story behind the glory. I also believe that God is not silent when we suffer and that we ought to reject the shame and embrace the hope in Christ. Finally, that: 1) depression is not as uncommon as you think and affects a lot of people, 2) it’s OK not to be OK sometimes, and, 3) there’s always help around the corner.

So, I hope this episode helps someone feel connected and to remind that someone that they are not alone. Don’t give up on fighting and it’s OK to seek help. Here’s me saying that a new day will dawn tomorrow and you’d be there with me to practice your purpose once again; one replete with choosing life and finding ways to be more gentle and compassionate with yourself. That you would always remember to remind yourself that you are enough and always will be.That every baby steps you are taking right now to get back on track are a significant move towards the right path.

PS: We also explored how funnily our depression can be brought on by just not our fear of failure but when we succeed. And how there’s a recurring struggle with purpose and productivity, and how these are tied to our self-worth. Ayokunle Falomo is: a Nigerian, a TEDx speaker, an American, the winner of the 2018 Stacy Doris Memorial Award and the author of kin.DREAD & thread, this wordweaver must! As a poet, his singular mission is to use his pen as a shovel to unearth those things that make us human. He and his work have been featured in print (Local Houston magazine, Glass Mountain) and online (The New York Times, Houston Chronicle, and Berkeley Poetry Review. You can find more information about him and his work at www.kindreadbook.com

 

Read More